Completion Rates and Hepatotoxicity of Isoniazid Preventive Therapy Among Children Living with HIV/AIDS: Findings and Implications in Northwestern Nigeria

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Completion Rates and Hepatotoxicity of Isoniazid Preventive Therapy Among Children Living with HIV/AIDS: Findings and Implications in Northwestern Nigeria

Completion rates and hepatotoxicity of Isoniazid Preventive Therapy Among Children Living with HIV/AIDS: Findings and Implications in Northwestern Nigeria (Journal of Drugs and therapy perspective)

In this article, it was reported that the use of isoniazid preventive therapy among human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome-infected children is a cost-effective and evidenced-based mortality reduction strategy. However, there is a dearth of information on its completion rate and hepatotoxic potential among children in Nigeria. Findings also revealed a low isoniazid preventive therapy completion rate and novel/tailored isoniazid preventive therapy completion strategies are warranted. Further, isoniazid preventive therapy is probably safe among the study cohort and periodic serum alanine transaminase (or liver enzymes) determinations are required for children with advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease.

Furthermore, the authors advocated for training of the healthcare workers involved in the cascade of care of these children with counselling not restricted to counsellors but all the healthcare professionals in contact with these children and their caregivers. They recommended the development and use of efficient patient follow-up strategies that would increase the keeping of clinic appointments. They also advocated for a series of activities that would improve health literacy levels of the children and their caregivers as inadequate levels have been associated with poor health-seeking behaviors (late presentation, not keeping clinic appointments, stigma) and health outcomes (poor medication adherence), while adding that there should also be an efficient supply chain management to avoid occasional stockouts of HIV test kits and logistical challenges with INH.